Big Left Foundations Fund biased, barely legal voter programs

0
33


According to the IRS, tax-exempt 501 (c) (3) organizations are prohibited from “conducting education or registration activities for voters with signs of bias that … have the effect of favoring a candidate or group of candidates.” But for many years now, 501 (c) (3) voter engagement programs have violated the spirit of this law (if not the letter) by running programs that clearly favor democratic politicians.

The evidence is often in sight. More overshadowed, however, is a detailed plan to fund these programs during the 2012 election, released in 2016 as a result of a data hack by the George Soros-funded Open Society Foundations. The Soros memo from nine years ago may also have highlighted the embryonic phases of this year’s efforts by Congress Democrats to adopt federal electoral laws: the so-called For the People Act (H.R. 1).

Shenanigan’s turnout

Political journalists often fail to find and reveal the evidence that is right in front of them. Check out recent coverage of the Voter Participation Center, one of those 501 (c) (3) organizations. A time Profile dated February 2021 teased that it would reveal “The Secret Story of the Shadow Campaign That Saved the 2020 Election”. timeThe secret seekers have credited the Voter Participation Center for “sending ballot requests to 15 million people in key states” and getting 4.6 million people to return them.

“All of the work we’ve been doing for 17 years has been designed for this moment to bring democracy to people’s doorsteps,” said the organization’s CEO Tom Lopach, according to the magazine.

Not reported by time is that the democracy of the Voter Participation Center was not for it all the “front door of the people”. The Voter Participation Center website reads “We are the new American majority” and carefully defines this as “young people, people of color and unmarried women”.

Obviously, this leaves some people out. In a suspiciously fortunate coincidence, the poll of the 2020 elections shows that the so-called “New American Majority” cast 60 percent or more of their votes to Joe Biden.

Consider another way to target a majority: gun owners (40 percent of American households), white men (61 percent voted for Trump in 2020), white Protestants (72 percent for Trump), and opponents of abortion (more than four of each) 10 voters, 72 percent support for Trump). It’s hard to imagine time Failure to report whether voter engagement 501 (c) (3) was so obviously moved to a right-wing constituency. The IRS might even take note. (An informed cynic might suggest that the only thing that will ever stop this behavior is a comparatively large effort by a Republican biased tax-exempt organization to do the same.)

While proof of support for the Democratic Voter Participation Center cannot be missed with a visit to the website in just five seconds, a lot more can be discovered with little additional effort.

Tom Lopach, who only became CEO of the Voter Participation Center in 2020, has two decades of experience working for democratic politicians and causes. Lopach is also the CEO of the Center for Voter Information – a 501 (c) (4) advocacy organization that is allowed to have a partisan bias.

However, it is identified on the Center for Voter Information website as a “partner organization” of the Voter Participation Center. A joint press release sponsored by the two organizations in August 2020 announced that Joe Biden’s acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention produced an “exceptional response” from their New American Majority, “one that advanced the campaign strategy and defined him as a leader “. has weakened Donald Trump and increased Biden’s voting leeway. “

The real challenge for an honest reporter is to find a case where the Voter Participation Center does not violate the clear spirit of the 501 (c) (3) tax law. Almost everything the organization does and is associated with appears to be purposely designed to “favor a candidate or a group of candidates”.

The Soros memo

The extent appears to be disclosed in the 2012 election planning protocol addressed to George Soros. Ironically, a possible violation of the law is why we know it exists.

According to an August 2016 report in the hillDCLeaks (a shady cyberhacker group) publicly released “more than 2,000 documents related to Democratic billionaire George Soros and his Open Society Foundations”. In August 2016, DCLeaks also released the content of emails sent by the National Democratic Committee and Republican officials.

All of these DCLeaks documents appear to have been obtained through illegal data breaches. The link to the DCLeaks archive “Soros” no longer seems to contain the stolen data. (Before the archive disappeared, the Capital Research Center made a PDF copy of the 2012 “Soros Memo” discussed below).

Former President of the Service Employees International Union, Andy Stern, and Deepak Bhargava were reportedly the authors of the memo. Bhargava was then executive director of the Center for Community Change, another post-501 (c) (3) left-wing tax-free organization that is directly related to voter engagement programs. The seven-page memorandum was addressed to Soros and the Program Board of his Open Society Foundations.

The memo called for additional funding for “voter engagement” during the 2012 election, which “would be closely geared to increasing the turnout of black, Latino and youth constituencies”. It has been proposed to merge this into a “long-term independent political force capable of holding elected leaders of all parties accountable in order to open up society’s values ​​and priorities both before and after election day.”

“Open society values” have been defined as a left-wing set of “priorities that matter to us,” such as tax hikes, spending hikes, and protecting the power of public employees’ unions. The memo blamed the “dramatic retreat” of “black, Latin American and young voters” during the 2010 mid-term election for the defeat of the open society priorities and the success of the tea party goals.

Although there was no contact with “unmarried women”, the goals of the memo were dangerously in line with the work of the Voter Participation Center. This is no accident: the memo made repeated references to female voices, female voices, the name by which the center was known at the time. The memo stated that women’s votes were “often quoted” for being “among the largest voter registration operations in the nation.”

Open injury

Even before the name change, the intention to violate the spirit of tax status was an open secret. In his 2012 book The Victory Lab: The Secret Science of Winning CampaignsCommenting on the women’s voices, left-wing reporter Sasha Issenberg said: “Although the group was officially impartial for tax reasons, it was no secret that the goal of all of its efforts was to generate new votes for Democrats.” Strangely, the Soros memo offered a backward protection on this very point: “This is Notboth legally and philosophically about candidates or parties. ” [emphasis in original]

The Soros memo asked for one additionally $ 9 million from the Open Society Foundations (in addition to the $ 7.3 million already allocated) to be sent to Voter Participation Center and many other similar “voter retention” projects.

The memo showed that at least $ 75.4 million had already been raised or pledged for 2012 programs by at least seven other large donors to left-wing projects. The Ford Foundation, one of the largest American philanthropy battleships in American history, was hired for $ 20 million. Carnegie Corporation reported $ 5.6 million.

Courtesy of the Capital Research Center

Victory Lab Author Issenberg portrayed Carnegie as a pioneer in partisan campaigning: “Because tax laws allowed nonprofits to register and vote as long as they did not press a specific candidate and organized ‘historically disenfranchised’ communities (as Carnegie described it) was going to a backdoor approach to gaining democratic votes outside of the campaign finance laws that governed candidates, parties, and political action committees. “

Paradigm shift

More ambitiously, the Soros memo also called for the financing of a “Paradigm Shift Campaign ” [emphasis in original] to get the strong left donors “out of the business with the commitment of voters”. Universal voter registration was the specific change that was considered. However, the authors also suggested using the funds for “generating new ideas”. Significantly, the memo accused states of creating “onerous new rules for identifying voters.”

There is a logical line between the 2012 memo and the For the People Act of 2021 that is supported by the Democratic leadership of Congress. If passed as it was originally written, the law would tear apart basic voting security measures like the photo identification laws. It would create automatic registration, require states to allow any voter to vote by mail, and prohibit providing proof of identification requirements for postal voting. Every voter would be entitled to online access to a postal ballot and would only need to add a signature to “prove” that the right person voted.

The For the People Act would bring about the “paradigm shift” proposed in the Soros memo. The big left donors would no longer have to fund biased voter registration programs. Instead of circumventing the spirit of tax laws, we would have improved and universal access to electoral fraud.

Ken Brown is the lead investigative researcher at the Capital Research Center.





Source link

Thank You For Visiting. Please Support This Site By SHARING And Following Us In The Social Networks.

Leave a Comment