Can you spot the hidden messages inside NASA’s Artemis I Orion spacecraft?

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The end of the Artemis I spacecraft’s trip around the moon brought a surprise for some space visitors that only advanced space enthusiasts could see — secret messages intentionally paved around the Orion capsule as part of a challenge NASA dubbed an “Easter Egg.” designated. Hunt.

The hidden gems, dubbed “Easter eggs” by the space agency, were anything but the usual brightly colored plastic trays children use to find their best Sunday clothes they’re looking for.

Among the data-gathering puppets, experiments, and other important technologies were mementos of space history, tributes, and even mysteries that NASA asked the world to recognize in its sometimes pretty crappy images.

The mission wasn’t the first time NASA has embedded messages in spacecraft. Voyager 1 and 2, several Mars rovers, and other historic missions all contained memorabilia ranging from images of Earth to metal from New York’s 9-11 twin towers.

The space agency teased the capsule’s “Easter eggs” for weeks, but lifted the veil of secrecy on the eve of the capsule’s landing on Earth.

Can you spot the five hidden messages in the cabin?

Article #1 – Cardinal

The image of a cardinal pays homage to Mark Geyer, former manager of the Orion program and staunch fan of the St. Louis Cardinals.
NASA

Above the window of Orion’s pilot’s seat is an image of a red cardinal. NASA said the bird was a tribute to former Orion program manager Mark Geyer. Geyer died in 2021 and was the first spacecraft program manager. A native of Indianapolis, he was a staunch fan of the St. Louis Cardinals and had worked at NASA since 1994.

Item #2 – Morse Code Symbol

A Morse code symbol for "charlie" Commemorates Deputy Orion Program Manager Charlie Lundquist, who died in 2020.
A Morse code symbol for “Charlie” commemorates Deputy Orion Program Manager Charlie Lundquist, who died in 2020.

NASA

Above the voice-activated technology demonstration panel in the center of the cabin are the symbols for “Charlie” in Morse code. NASA said the code commemorates the life of former Deputy Orion Program Manager Charlie Lundquist, who died in 2020. Lundquist began his NASA career in 1993 and was responsible for the design, development and testing of the spacecraft.

Item #3 – Country Codes

Country codes represent each country involved in the construction of the spacecraft's European service module.
Country codes represent each country involved in the construction of the spacecraft’s European service module.

NASA

The effort to launch the Mega Lunar Rocket was a global effort, and as evidence of nearly a dozen countries involved in building the capsule, each country’s code was placed in the cabin. The country codes can be seen in front of the pilot’s seat under the voice-activated technology demonstration panel. Countries include the United States, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Spain and the Netherlands.

Article #4 – Music Letters

On the right side of the cabin, near the pilot’s seat, you can see the letters “CBAGF” on a yellow background. NASA says it’s the sheet music to Frank Sinatra’s 1964 song “Fly Me to the Moon.” Many associate the hit musical with Apollo missions that took place in the 1960s and 1970s. Once Artemis I and II are considered successful, NASA says the Artemis III mission could land astronauts on the moon as early as 2025.

Item #5 – Binary Code

The binary code for the number 18 celebrates the return to the moon after Apollo 17.
The binary code for the number 18 celebrates the return to the moon after Apollo 17.

NASA

To the right of the NASA logo, above the pilot’s seat, are black and white blocks. These blocks represent the code 10010, or the number 18. NASA says the binary code honors the Apollo program and signifies the return to the moon after Apollo 17. The 1972 mission was the last time humans set foot on the lunar body.



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